Articles | Volume 34, issue 1
Eur. J. Mineral., 34, 149–165, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/ejm-34-149-2022

Special issue: Probing the Earth: experiments and mineral physics at mantle...

Eur. J. Mineral., 34, 149–165, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/ejm-34-149-2022
Research article
28 Feb 2022
Research article | 28 Feb 2022

Lower mantle geotherms, flux, and power from incorporating new experimental and theoretical constraints on heat transport properties in an inverse model

Anne M. Hofmeister

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Short summary
The previously unknown temperature gradient in Earth's largest layer is uniquely extracted from a seismology average, the only information available. Data used from laboratory studies are minimal and describe general behavior. Adding a new theory and data on heat transport properties provides flux (heat per area per time) and power (total wattage) vs. depth. Temperature vs. depth instead uses an additive constant, which is constrained by data on melting. I show the lower mantle is heating up.